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Vera Xingyu Zhang
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Rachel Campbell commented on Vera Xingyu Zhang's blog post Reading Response-BELL_KNOWING OURSELVES AS INSTRCTORS
"While I agreed that the teaching methods based in psychology are effective, I also feel that a little knowledge can be a dangerous thing.  I think that classes centered on the psychology of students at the age range you are teaching could be…"
Sep 16, 2014
Rita Crocker commented on Vera Xingyu Zhang's blog post Reading Response-BELL_KNOWING OURSELVES AS INSTRCTORS
"I agree with you, and believe that psychology should be a required course in education curriculum. In industries where professionals have to work with clients on both primary and secondary levels, such as teachers, one must be able to develop…"
Sep 16, 2014
Alex Congi left a comment for Vera Xingyu Zhang
"I thought this was very insightful and honest. It establishes the social justice classroom as an environment for ongoing learning that includes the instructor as a participant as well. As the title suggests, "Knowing Ourselves as…"
Sep 15, 2014
Diana Cadavid left a comment for Vera Xingyu Zhang
"I consider this article a reassuring reminder that allowing ourselves to be honest, vulnerable, and open with people in our profesional lives are vital elements for empathy. In teaching, especially engaging with social justice issues in the…"
Sep 15, 2014
Mary Milliken commented on Vera Xingyu Zhang's blog post Reading Response-BELL_KNOWING OURSELVES AS INSTRCTORS
"I agree with Jen, in that the topics and methods discussed in this reading can be applied to all students in teachers because these are issues we all confront when we interact with each other on a daily basis or travel to a new place. I also agree…"
Sep 15, 2014
Jennifer Yoo commented on Vera Xingyu Zhang's blog post Reading Response-BELL_KNOWING OURSELVES AS INSTRCTORS
"This reading is very likable and relatable. First, I liked the format of it because it was easy to read and understand through the explanation and dialogs. The explanation of how to deal with each situation was helpful in that it listed common…"
Sep 15, 2014
William Estrada left a comment for Vera Xingyu Zhang
"Knowing Ourselves as Instructors is a great read. Bell's ability to brake down what questions we should be asking ourselves are right on point! I had to step back and rethink what type of questions I ask myself when confronted with tough…"
Sep 14, 2014
Vera Xingyu Zhang commented on Casey Mae Carlock's blog post Response to "Opening the Classroom Door"
"After reading this article, I felt this is such a good introduction to the book. The chapter is literally about “opening the classroom door”, it gives several points on how to prepare to be a teacher, how to pursue the class and so on. I…"
Sep 14, 2014
Joseph A Hladik commented on Vera Xingyu Zhang's blog post Reading Response-BELL_KNOWING OURSELVES AS INSTRCTORS
"I definitely found this article comforting as well.  I think it's normal to have fears about instructing such controversial or potentially heated discussions.  As an educator of social justice topics you want students to be able to…"
Sep 14, 2014
Anna Lentz commented on Vera Xingyu Zhang's blog post Reading Response-BELL_KNOWING OURSELVES AS INSTRCTORS
"I appreciate the format of this chapter in discussing how social justice learning is conducted in the classroom.  Particularly having more experience as a student than a teacher in these types of settings, it is reassuring to hear that teachers…"
Sep 13, 2014
Anna Lentz left a comment for Vera Xingyu Zhang
"I appreciate the format of this chapter in discussing how social justice learning is conducted in the classroom.  Particularly having more experience as a student than a teacher in these types of settings, it is reassuring to hear that teachers…"
Sep 13, 2014
Casey Mae Carlock left a comment for Vera Xingyu Zhang
"What year did you complete your undergrad at SAIC?  I also did my undergrad at SAIC!  Why did you decide to return to SAIC for you masters?"
Sep 13, 2014
Casey Mae Carlock commented on Vera Xingyu Zhang's blog post Reading Response-BELL_KNOWING OURSELVES AS INSTRCTORS
"A psychology class could be beneficial forteachers but I don't think it's necessary for several reasons.  If you are an art teacher/specialist, you see a whole range of student at different ages. You would end taking a lot of…"
Sep 12, 2014
Vera Xingyu Zhang posted blog posts
Sep 12, 2014
Vera Xingyu Zhang is now a member of SAIC Art Education
Sep 5, 2014

Profile Information

What degree program are you in?
MAAE
Hometown
Chongqing, China
About Me:
Hi, this is Vera. I am a current first year MAAE student. My background is in painting and drawing. When I spent my undergraduate years at SAIC. I switched my study focus many times, started from interior architecture to animation, viscom, and finally, I had decided that I love painting and drawing. Which I think painting and drawing could give me unlimited freedom to access my mind, my imaginations into my work without concerning about viewer and audience. Because I only paint or draw for myself. I would hope that after earning this degree from Master of Art in Art Education program. I will have enough knowledge to become a painting and drawing professor back in my hometown. ^.^ (good good study and day day up- a Chinglish slogan of being a hard worker at school) ^.^ Thanks for visiting my page.
Website:
http://www.msverazhang.com

Vera Xingyu Zhang's Blog

Reading Response-BELL_KNOWING OURSELVES AS INSTRCTORS

Posted on September 12, 2014 at 1:00am 9 Comments

    This article tells us what issues teachers might face in raising a social justice discussion. Author used a very convincing way to give readers solutions to problems happening in social justice discussion through talking about different teacher’s experience in teaching social justice class. Also, author has addressed the value of having social justice discussion in class. Through reading this article I understood that having such discussion, student could learn about how to use different…

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Reflections for Eth/Ped

Posted on September 12, 2014 at 12:50am 0 Comments

According to this course assignment, I will list three teacher of mine who have greatly impacted my desire as a learner and my passion to become a teacher. 

First one is my piano teacher Mr. Zhang. He taught me piano for seven years, starting from when I was seven years old. I really appreciate how patient he was when he was having class with me. I was not an easy girl to deal with. I didn't like to spend time to figure out the sheet music and I didn't like to practice. He told me a…

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Comment Wall (6 comments)

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At 12:51pm on September 24, 2015, stella kwale said…

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At 4:38pm on September 15, 2014, Alex Congi said…

I thought this was very insightful and honest. It establishes the social justice classroom as an environment for ongoing learning that includes the instructor as a participant as well. As the title suggests, "Knowing Ourselves as Instructors" is a critical understanding of the self that shapes the way we approach oppression issues. Not only do we need to identify our fears, assumptions, and unconscious biases, but we need to be willing to acknowledge our own shortcomings in the classroom.

I truly enjoyed the voices of the social justice educators. Their openness about their insecurities was reassuring and they provided methods for dealing with problems we will inevitable encounter as educators.

I appreciate how the article differentiates social justice teaching from its traditional counterpart. The classroom isn't simply a place for transferring rote knowledge from authority figure to student, but an environment to break down engrained socialization. This is achieved by stressing that learning from social justice is an ongoing process - lessons do not necessarily wrap up in a tidy manner and students may leave the classroom with more questions than they originally came in with. The redefinition of classroom as a space for personal development, for both teacher and student, is very exciting.

At 11:03am on September 15, 2014, Diana Cadavid said…

I consider this article a reassuring reminder that allowing ourselves to be honest, vulnerable, and open with people in our profesional lives are vital elements for empathy. In teaching, especially engaging with social justice issues in the classroom, I definitely agree that it is important to build empathic interactions with students as the reading suggests. However, I still find it can be very complex for teachers sometimes, even when they disclose their own uncertainties, to guide properly targeted students in their learning process when the teachers are not yet sensitive with their students' perspectives and very intense emotions. In a case like this, even in an allowed vulnerable environment, do you think those shared experiences should be mildly kept under control in a classroom? or the more open a student is, the better for the teacher? Anyway I like that the article is very helpful for instructors in proposing several cogent solutions that can be explored along the way of teaching.

Although there are several cognitive and emotional complexities that may be perceived in social justice discussions, I do not think that teachers-students need a psychology class as a requirement before approaching such topics. I do agree that a class like this should be offered as an elective for those interested in digging deeper on the study of the mind and stuff. And this undoubtedly will give you a broader awareness in addressing psychological standpoints. But as I mentioned before, a class like this should be offered just as an elective, I think.

At 11:51pm on September 14, 2014, William Estrada said…

Knowing Ourselves as Instructors is a great read. Bell's ability to brake down what questions we should be asking ourselves are right on point! I had to step back and rethink what type of questions I ask myself when confronted with tough decisions in the classroom. We need to be aware of how our experiences, our ideals, our surroundings affect how we see our students, how we interact with them, how we teach them. Thinking critically about how we respond to high stress situations and being honest about them is part of being a great teacher. We are the models we are asking our students to become, by no means does it mean we are perfect but just as we expect our students to make radical changes to the way they think - we as teachers must make does changes as well. Bell states, "social justice is not simply new content but often a radical chage in process as well.

We need to make that radical change ourselves. Put everything on the line and allow for our emotions and those of our students to be part of the learning process. I can recall many times I've been stumped by students questions or responses to my instruction. Although it can be difficult because we have been taught to "take control" of our classrooms, Bell reminds us that we must creae a space that allows for cirtical thinking to take place, a place for students to feel comfortable with what they are sharing but we should also make sure we are pushing those ideas, teaching and learning out of our own comfort zones. 

What biases do we bring to our own classroom and how do we address them with our students in order to create a space where controversial ideas/scenarious are not dismissed but addressed in a caring, thoughtful, and open way?

At 6:49pm on September 13, 2014, Anna Lentz said…

I appreciate the format of this chapter in discussing how social justice learning is conducted in the classroom.  Particularly having more experience as a student than a teacher in these types of settings, it is reassuring to hear that teachers and students share vulnerability and emotion.  In fact it is in the moments of vulnerability that empathy can play an important role in bonding a class or even helping each other see disparate points of view.  This reminded me Ayers and Alexander-Tanner reading, which mentioned that crying was allowed in the Lawndale Little Village High School. Perhaps because I am such an emotional person and have been known to shed some tears or speak in a quivering voice that this principle struck me as refreshing and comforting.

Of course there are times when discussion can lead to a paralytic standstill as a result of a traumatic statement. The article advised to redirect the energy of the class by taking a break or turning the response into an individual reflection.  I find this advice helpful and reassuring to know that those in the teacher role can be as unsettled as the students.  If we are all bringing varied identities and experiences to the classroom forum along with varied identities imposed upon us by society and social groups there is bound to be a messy-business in the classroom devoted to social justice.  I have found that this can lead to not only discomfort and unease, but also the greatest learning opportunities that have staying power in my life.  As the article insists, we have to constantly evolve and interrogate our worlds and ourselves as teachers and students.  Has anyone else experienced the uncomfortable learning moments in classes discussing injustice surrounding race, sexual identity, religion, class, etc.?

BY: ANNA LENTZ

At 11:08am on September 13, 2014, Casey Mae Carlock said…

What year did you complete your undergrad at SAIC?  I also did my undergrad at SAIC!  Why did you decide to return to SAIC for you masters?

 
 
 

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